Canonical Wold Newton Works

A canonical Wold Newton work is a biography, essay, novel, or story written or cowritten by Philip José Farmer. Following is a listing of Farmer’s canonical Wold Newton works.

Biographies

Farmer’s biographies of his two greatest heroes are written “straight,”in the tradition of William S. Baring-Gould’s Sherlock Holmes of Baker Street; they are biographies of real, living people.

Tarzan Alive: A Definitive Biography of Lord Greystoke. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co., 1972. New York: Popular Library, 1976. New York: Playboy Paperbacks, 1981. Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press Bison Books, 2006.

Through the tales of Edgar Rice Burroughs, generations of readers have thrilled to the adventures of Lord Greystoke (aka John Clayton, but better known as Tarzan of the Apes). In this biography, Philip José Farmer pieces together the life of this fantastic man, pulling the veil back on Burroughs’ deliberate deceptions and tracing Tarzan’s family tree back to other extraordinary figures, including Sherlock and Mycroft Holmes, the Scarlet Pimpernel, Doc Savage, Nero Wolfe, and Bulldog Drummond.

Tarzan Alive offers the first chronological account of Tarzan’s life, narrated in careful detail garnered from Burroughs’ stories and other sources. From the ill-fated voyage that led to Greystoke’s birth on the isolated African coast to his final adventures as a group captain in the RAF during World War II, Farmer constructs a comprehensive and authoritative account. Farmer’s assertion that Tarzan was a real person has led him to craft a biography as well researched and compelling as that of any character from conventional history

Doc Savage: His Apocalyptic Life. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co., 1973. New York: Bantam Books, 1975. New York: Playboy Paperbacks, 1981. Deluxe Hardcover Edition: Atlanta, GA: Meteor House, 2013. Trade Edition: Altus Press, 2013.

He is the greatest hero of our time—Doc Savage! Philip José Farmer, three-time Hugo award winner and Science Fiction Grand Master, has turned his superb research and narrative skills to one of the greatest heroes of our time: Doc Savage, the bronze champion of justice. Now, at last, the incredible life story of the real man behind the Doc Savage pulp novels, including:

–His true name and family background, covering his relationship to Lord Greystoke, Sherlock Holmes, Sam Spade, James Bond, and Fu Manchu.

–Detailed information on some of his most devilish opponents—John Sunlight, the Mystic Mullah, and Mr. Wail.

–A summation of some of Doc’s most amazing inventions.

–Biographies of the Fabulous Five—Monk, Ham, Renny, Long Tom, and Johnny—as well as the group’s Lady Auxiliary and Bronze Knockout, Pat Savage!

Together with other data and brilliant deductions, Philip José Farmer offers an amazing account of this remarkable man’s astonishing career!


Novels

Time’s Last Gift. New York: Del Rey Books, 1972. Revised edition New York: Del Rey Books, 1977. London: Titan Books, 2012. (Khokarsa/Ancient Opar series prequel.)

Three men and a woman onboard a timeship travel from 2070 AD to 12,000 BC—a journey that could never be repeated. For the passengers, all anthropologists, it was a once-in-a-million-lifetimes expedition… a chance to study primitive man as modern man never could. But none of them was prepared for what they would discover—or for the impact of their travels in a time that had yet to come…

Many clues in the novel, as well as the abbreviation of this book’s title, TLG, hint that the expedition’s leader, John Gribardsun, may well be a certain immortal jungle lord…

The Adventure of the Peerless Peer by John H. Watson, M.D. Boulder, CO: The Aspen Press, 1974; New York: Dell Books, 1976. Reprinted in Venus on the Half-Shell and Others. Christopher Paul Carey, ed. Burton, MI: Subterranean Press, 2008. Reissued as The Peerless Peer. London: Titan Books, 2011.

Holmes and Watson take to the skies in the quest of the nefarious Von Bork and his weapon of dread… A night sky aerial engagement with the deadly Fokker nearly claims three brilliant lives… And an historic alliance is formed, whereby Baker Street’s enigmatic mystery-solver and Greystoke, the noble savage, peer of the realm and lord of the jungle, team up to bring down the hellish hun!

Farmer was obligated to remove Greystoke from this novel when it was republished as The Adventure of the Three Madmen in the anthology The Grand Adventure (New York: Berkley Books, 1984). In addition to Holmes and Greystoke, The Shadow, G-8, Sir Henry Merrivale, and other characters appear (in some cases, the identities of these characters are hinted at; in other cases, the characters are named outright). The Madmen version replaced Greystoke with Mowgli from Kipling’s The Jungle Book. Decades later, Farmer was allowed to reprint the original version.

The Other Log of Phileas Fogg. New York: DAW Books, 1973. New York: Tor Books, 1982. London: Titan Books, 2012. (Phileas Fogg series #1.)

A secret alien war has raged on Earth for years and is about to culminate in an epic race. In a delicious slice of sci-fi whimsy that sits cleverly alongside Jules Verne’s original tale, Around the World in Eighty Days, Phileas Fogg’s epic global journey is not the product of a daft wager but, in fact, a covert mission to chase down the elusive Captain Nemo—who is none other than Professor Moriarty.

Hadon of Ancient Opar. New York: DAW Books, 1974. Reprinted in the omnibus Gods of Opar. Burton, MI: Subterranean Press, 2012. New standalone edition: London: Titan Books, 2013. (Khokarsa/Ancient Opar series #1.)

Set in the ancient Africa of both Burroughs and Haggard… Opar, the lost colony of Atlantis, is hidden deep in the heart of Africa, awash with incredible riches. From this ancient city comes Hadon, an impoverished but ambitious young man who sets out to win the great games of Klakor, and thus become king of the Khokarsan Empire. As his quest for the throne leads him into the wild lands beyond the empire’s edge, Hadon finds himself embroiled in a bloody civil war.

Venus on the Half-Shell by Kilgore Trout. New York: Dell Books, 1975. New York: Bantam Books, 1988. Reprinted in Venus on the Half-Shell and Others. Id. New standalone edition: London: Titan Books, 2013.

Simon Wagstaff narrowly escapes the deluge that destroys Earth when he happens upon an abandoned spaceship. A man without a planet, he gains immortality from an elixir drunk during an interlude with a cat-like alien queen. Now Simon must chart a 3,000-year course to the most distant corners of the multiverse, to seek out the answers to the questions no one can seem to answer.

This novel, written by Wold Newton Family member Kilgore Trout, mentions Jonathan Swift Somers III and his epic biographies of Ralph von Wau Wau, making it one possible future of the Wold Newton Universe.

Flight to Opar. New York: DAW Books, 1976. Reprinted in the omnibus Gods of Opar. Burton, MI: Subterranean Press, 2012. Restored Edition: Atlanta, GA: Meteor House, 2015. (Khokarsa/Ancient Opar series #2.)

Set in the ancient Africa of both Burroughs and Haggard… Hadon of Opar was the winner of the Great Games and the rightful claimant to the throne of Khokarsa, a mighty empire that stretched along the shores of ancient Africa’s great inland seas. But the old king has refused to surrender his power, and Hadon finds himself caught in the middle of a bloody civil war between the zealous priests of the sun god and the beneficent priestesses of the great mother goddess.

Now a divination of the oracle hurls Hadon on his most dangerous adventure yet. With a tyrant’s armies and warships hot on their heels, Hadon and his companions must set out on a journey through perilous jungles and across storm-wracked seas to reach the city of his birth―for only in far-flung golden Opar can he fulfill the oracle’s prophecy and save the land from utter doom.

Ironcastle. J.-H. Rosny Aîné, translated and retold in English by Philip José Farmer. New York: DAW Books, 1976.

Somewhere in the unexplored heart of Africa, a part of this Earth has been taken over by an intelligence from outer space. Such was the message that reached the explorer Hareton Ironcastle, member of the famous Baltimore Gun Club. In that hidden and transformed valley would now be found monsters and pre-humans not to be seen anywhere else. Such a challenge could not be ignored, and the account of Ironcastle’s expedition of daring but inexperienced amateurs became one of the classic novels of the French writer, J.H. Rosny, who was a contemporary of Verne, Wells, and Edgar Rice Burroughs. Now Philip José Farmer, Hugo winner and chronicler of the adventures of Tarzan and Doc Savage, has translated and retold Rosny’s novel, making it a marvel adventure novel to stand alongside the works of Burroughs, Haggard. and Farmer himself.

Farmer, in his translation and retelling, added some Wold Newton connections, including a reference to Doc Savage’s father.

The Lavalite World. New York: Ace Books, 1977. (The World of Tiers series #5, various publishers, 1965–1993.)

In the fifth book, The Lavalite World (New York: Ace Books, 1977), it is revealed that the main protagonist of the series, Paul Janus “Kickaha” Finnegan, is a Wold Newton Family member, related to the Foggs of England and the Texas Fogs of J.T. Edson’s Dusty Fog sagas.

Imagine a whole series of separate universes, made to suit the whims of a race of super-beings. Imagine these universes with their own laws, cultures, creatures and ecologies―all existing only to please the fancies of their individual master. The lavalite world is a world of slow but constant change. Here mountains rise from plains, or sink into rifts; new oceans form as vast hollows collapse and seas rush in. There is only one escape from this world where the very landscape moves. The gateway to other universes is in the palace of the Lord Urthona. Paul Janus Finnegan―also known as Kickaha, the Earthborn adventurer of the tiered worlds―must reach it if he is to survive. And he must do so despite Urthona and Red Orc, the hired thug McKay, flesh-eating vegetation on the move, and planetary pseudopods…

Stations of the Nightmare. New York: Tor Books, 1982.

His journey began with the blast of a shotgun aimed at a gleaming nimbus of light. The tightening of his finger on the trigger was almost accidental; his punishment was almost merciful. But his journey has just begun, and when it is over Paul Eyre will no longer be human….

Leo Queequeeg Tincrowder, a Wold Newton Family member and cousin of Kilgore Trout, is a supporting character.

Escape from Loki: Doc Savage’s First Adventure. New York: Bantam Books, 1991.

A brilliant supervillain has dreamed up the ultimate secret weapon… a desperate masterstroke that will assure victory for the Kaiser—or obliterate mankind from the face of the earth! Young Clark Savage and his team come together for the first time in this action-packed saga of World War I. Though only sixteen, he’s the real Doc—hard fisted, cerebral, the compassionate Man of Bronze. Shot down behind enemy lines. Captured by a German baron and his exotic mistress. Escaped. Recaptured. Finally imprisoned in escape-proof salt mines—where the baron’s experiments on human guinea pigs could result in a sinister weapon of total destruction. It’s Doc’s young mind against evil’s keenest intellect. And unless Doc wins, the war could end for the Allies—in a blaze of genocidal fury!

The Dark Heart of Time: A Tarzan Novel. New York: Del Rey Books, 1999.

Tarzan’s beloved mate, Jane, has been kidnapped, and the furious ape-man will let nothing stand in the way of rescuing her—not even a sinister safari whose target is Tarzan himself. With fierce Masai trackers leading the chase, a trio of white hunters is hell-bent on capturing the Jungle Lord. But as his pursuers close in on their prey with uncanny accuracy, Tarzan races toward even greater danger ahead. For the trail leads to a bizarre, long-forgotten land boasting a multitude of strange and terrifying mysteries: the City Built by God, the Hideous Hunter, and, most shocking of all, the Crystal Tree of Time—whose seductive powers could ultimately spell Tarzan’s doom…

The Evil in Pemberley House (cowritten with Win Scott Eckert). Burton, MI: Subterranean Press, 2009. Atlanta, GA: Meteor House, 2014. (Pat Wildman series #1.)

Patricia Wildman, the daughter of the world-renowned adventurer and crime fighter of the 1930s and ’40s, Dr. James Clarke “Doc” Wildman, is all alone in the world when she inherits the family estate in Derbyshire, England—in true Gothic tradition, old, dark, and supposedly haunted. But is the ghost real, or a clever sham perpetrated by others to scare her off? As Patricia contends with the questionable motives of her distant relatives, attempts to discern friend from foe, and battles to overcome mysterious attackers, she struggles to reconcile the supernatural with her rational scientific upbringing, while also attempting to work through unresolved feelings about her late parents.

Set at Pemberley from Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice and deeply ingrained in worlds of Sherlock Holmes and Lord Greystoke—as well as the bronze champion of justice, Doc Wildman—The Evil in Pemberley House is a darkly erotic novel with broad appeal to readers of pulp and popular literature, and fans of Philip José Farmer’s own celebrated Wold Newton Family.

The Song of Kwasin (cowritten with Christopher Paul Carey). Published in the omnibus Gods of Opar. Burton, MI: Subterranean Press, 2012. New standalone edition: Atlanta, GA: Meteor House, 2015. (Khokarsa/Ancient Opar series #3.)

Set in the ancient Africa of both Burroughs and Haggard… After years of exile in the Wild Lands, the giant warrior Kwasin of Dythbeth returns to the mighty Khokarsan Empire seeking the oracle’s forgiveness, only to find his native land torn asunder in a bloody civil war. The tyrannical King Minruth has usurped the throne from his daughter Awineth and, allied with the priests of the sun god Resu, overturned the beneficent, centuries-old rule of the priestesses of the goddess Kho. His spoiled cousin Hadon having fled with his companions to far-flung Opar, Kwasin soon finds he will have to take up the cause alone against Minruth the Mad.

Wielding his massive Ax of Victory, forged from the heart of a fallen star, Kwasin sets out to reconquer the throne of Khokarsa. But when he finds himself caught between a vengeful queen who seeks to control him and a conspiring priest who wants him dead, Kwasin must decide between reining in his unruly passions or unleashing them in a fury that could hurl the empire into oblivion. For the high priestess has decreed that unless Kwasin can master his wild nature and stop King Minruth before he attains immortality in an unholy ritual of the sun god, Great Kho will destroy all the land!


Short Fiction

“Skinburn.” Fantasy & Science Fiction, October 1972. Reprinted in The Book of Philip José Farmer. New York: DAW Books, 1973. Revised edition New York: Berkley Books, 1982. Reprinted in Tales of the Wold Newton Universe. Win Scott Eckert and Christopher Paul Carey, eds. London: Titan Books, 2013.

An adventure of Kent Lane, the son of The Shadow (a Wold Newton Family member) and Margo Lane.

“After King Kong Fell.” Omega. Roger Elwood, ed. New York: Walker and Company, 1973. Reprinted in The Grand Adventure. New York: Berkley Books, 1984. Reprinted in The Best of Philip José Farmer. Burton, MI: Subterranean Press, 2005. Reprinted in Tales of the Wold Newton Universe. Id..

The story features unnamed cameos by Doc Savage and The Shadow, who arrive at the Empire State Building in the aftermath of Kong’s plunge.

“A Scarletin Study” by Jonathan Swift Somers III. Fantasy & Science Fiction, March 1975. Reprinted in Sherlock Holmes Through Time and Space. Isaac Asimov, Martin Greenberg, and Charles Waugh, eds. New York: Bluejay Books, 1984. Reprinted in Pearls from Peoria. Paul Spiteri, ed. Burton, MI: Subterranean Press, 2006. Reprinted in Tales of the Wold Newton Universe. Id..

The first Ralph von Wau Wau tale by Jonathan Swift Somers III. Ralph von Wau Wau, a scientifically enhanced talking dog with a genius I.Q., was included by Farmer in his overall Wold Newton mythos in Doc Savage: His Apocalyptic Life.

“The Problem of the Sore Bridge—Among Others” by Harry “Bunny” Manders. Fantasy & Science Fiction, September 1975. Reprinted in Riverworld and Other Stories. New York: Berkley Books, 1979. Reprinted in Sherlock Holmes Through Time and Space. Id. Reprinted in Venus on the Half-Shell and Others. Id. Reprinted in Tales of the Wold Newton Universe. Id.

A Holmes-Raffles pastiche by Harry “Bunny” Manders. Both the Great Detective, Holmes, and the archetypal gentleman thief, Raffles, are Wold Newton Family members. Manders, Raffles’ sidekick, wrote four books about Raffles, all of which were edited for publication by E.W. Hornung, who was the brother-in-law of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Doyle edited Dr. John H. Watson’s tales of Sherlock Holmes for publication.

“The Volcano” by Paul Chapin. Fantasy & Science Fiction, February 1976. Reprinted in Riverworld and Other Stories. Id. Reprinted in Venus on the Half-Shell and Others. Id.

A short story by Paul Chapin, who once met Wold Newton Family member Nero Wolfe in Archie Goodwin’s novel The League of Frightened Men (edited for publication by Rex Stout). In “The Volcano,” private detective Curtius Parry works with a reporter named Edward Malone. This is likely the same Malone from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Professor Challenger stories.

“The Doge Whose Barque Was Worse Than His Bight” by Jonathan Swift Somers III. Fantasy & Science Fiction, November 1976. Reprinted in Pearls from Peoria. Paul Spiteri, ed. Burton, MI: Subterranean Press, 2006. Reprinted in Tales of the Wold Newton Universe. Id..

The second Ralph von Wau Wau tale by Jonathan Swift Somers III. Farmer began a third Ralph von Wau Wau tale, “Who Stole Stonehenge?” which remains unfinished.

“The Last Rise of Nick Adams.” The Book of Philip José Farmer. New York: Berkley Books, 1982. Reprinted in Venus on the Half-Shell and Others. Id.

Originally published as “The Impotency of Bad Karma” (Popular Culture, June 1977) under the byline Cordwainer Bird. Reprinted in Venus on the Half-Shell and Others. Christopher Paul Carey, ed. Burton, MI: Subterranean Press, 2008 (lettered leatherbound edition only). Cordwainer Bird is a Wold Newton Family member, as noted by Farmer in Doc Savage: His Apocalyptic Life. An even earlier version of the story, “Up, Out, and Over, Roger,” was published in The Worlds of Philip José Farmer 3: Portraits of a Trickster. Michael Croteau, ed. Atlanta, GA: Meteor House, 2012.

“The Freshman.” Fantasy & Science Fiction, May 1979. Reprinted in The Book of Philip José Farmer. New York: Berkley Books, 1982. Reprinted in Tales of the Cthulhu Mythos. James Turner, ed. Sauk City, WI: Arkham House, 1989; New York: Del Rey Books, 1998. Reprinted in Tales of the Wold Newton Universe. Id.

A descendant of a witch doctor from Burroughs’ Africa attends H.P. Lovecraft’s Miskatonic University.

“Nobody’s Perfect.” The Ultimate Dracula. Byron Preiss, ed. New York: Dell, 1991. New York: iBooks, 2003. Reprinted in Pearls from Peoria. Id.

Farmer refers to a member of the Van Helsing family in Doc Savage: His Apocalyptic Life; a Dracula story by Farmer likely takes place in the Wold Newton Universe.

“Evil, Be My Good.” The Ultimate Frankenstein. Byron Preiss, ed. New York: Dell, 1991. New York: iBooks, 2003. Reprinted in Pearls from Peoria. Id.

Farmer refers to Frankenstein’s experiments in Doc Savage: His Apocalyptic Life; a Frankenstein tale by Farmer likely takes place in the Wold Newton Universe.

“The Face that Launched a Thousand Eggs.” Farmerphile: The Magazine of Philip José Farmer No. 1, July 2005. Christopher Paul Carey and Paul Spiteri, eds.  Reprinted in Up From the Bottomless Pit and Other Stories. Christopher Paul Carey, ed. Burton, MI: Subterranean Press, 2007.

Tim Howller, the protagonist, is undoubtedly the same Tim Howller who appeared in “After King Kong Fell.”

“Doc Savage and the Cult of the Blue God.” Pearls from Peoria. Id.

A screenplay by Farmer for the second, and unmade, Doc Savage feature film. The screenplay was originally titled “Doc Savage: Archenemy of Evil.”


Secrets of the Nine series

Philip José Farmer’s novels of the Nine, A Feast Unknown (1969), Lord of the Trees (1970), and The Mad Goblin (1970) (all part of Titan Books’ Wold Newton series under the subheading “Secrets of the Nine-Parallel Universe”), present an interesting conundrum for followers of Farmer’s Wold Newton mythos. The books recount the ongoing battle of the ape-man Lord Grandrith and the man of bronze Doc Caliban against the Nine, a secret cabal of immortals bent on amassing power and manipulating the course of world events.

Unlike cousins Lord Greystoke and Doc Wildman, Grandrith and Caliban are half-brothers. They share a common history that is not based on the Wold Newton meteor strike. One widely accepted explanation for the discrepancy is that Lord Grandrith and Doc Caliban exist in a universe that is parallel, but very similar, to the Wold Newton Universe. The parallel universe theory is supported by Farmer’s fragment of a fourth Nine novel, The Monster on Hold. The fragment was introduced by Farmer at the 1983 World Fantasy Convention, and was published in the convention program.

A Feast Unknown. North Hollywood, CA: Essex House, 1969. Kansas City, MO: Fokker D-LXIX Press, 1975. London: Quartet Books, 1975. New York: Playboy Press, 1980. London: Grafton Books, 1988. London, Titan Books, 2012.

The diaries of Lord Grandrith, the legendary ape-man, lord of the jungle and bastard son of Jack the Ripper. Blessed with unnatural long life, his power brings with it a gruesome side effect—one shared by his nemesis, the formidable Doc Caliban, man of bronze and champion of justice.

But these two titans have more in common than they could ever have imagined. Who are the dark manipulators of their destiny?

Lord of the Trees | The Mad Goblin. New York: Ace Books, 1970 (double novel). New York: Ace Books, 1980 (double novel). London: Sphere Books, 1988 (as an omnibus: The Empire of the Nine [The Mad Goblin retitled Keepers of the Secrets]).

Lord of the Trees. London: Severn House, 1982. London: Sphere Books, 1983. London: Titan books, 2012.

“Having lived long enough with the charming fairy tale created by my biographer, I feel the time has come for the truth to be known. I propose to tell all; of the origins of the Nine, the elixir that gives us nearly eternal youth and superhuman strength, the struggles between us that set the world atremble.”

The Mad Goblin. London: Sphere Books, 1983 (as Keepers of the Secrets). London: Severn House, 1985 (as Keepers of the Secrets). London: Titan Books, 2013.

They were known simply as the Nine—grim and ancient rulers who thirty thousand years ago had discovered the key to eternal life and ever since had secretly held the world in thrall.

Once, Doc Caliban had been their servant and had shared their secrets. Now, appalled by their tyranny, he has turned against them, daring to challenge their centuries-old supremacy. Together with two henchmen whose superhuman skills match his own, Caliban sets out on the trail of the deadliest of the Nine: the mad goblin Iwaldi, the very incarnation of evil. . .

“The Monster on Hold (A chapter from a projected novel in the Lord Grandrith/Doc Caliban series).” Program to the 1983 World Fantasy Convention. Oak Forest: Weird Tales, 1983. Myths for the Modern Age: Philip José Farmer’s Wold Newton Universe. Win Scott Eckert, ed. Austin, TX: MonkeyBrain Books, 2005, and in Pearls from Peoria. Paul Spiteri, ed. Burton, MI: Subterranean Press, 2006.


Essays, Biographies, and Interviews – Creative Mythography

These short works by Philip José Farmer are in the vein of the Sherlockian “Game,” in which he speculates and proposes theories, and supports them by supplying contextual background information and persuasive argument. Chronologies, articles, worldbuilding guides, and short biographical sketches which resolve contradictions within a particular character’s canon of tales are also a staple of Farmer’s creative mythographical work. An essential conceit is that the subjects—Tarzan, Sherlock Holmes, Doc Savage, etc.—are real people who actually lived.

Several of the following pieces were reprinted in Myths for the Modern Age: Philip José Farmer’s Wold Newton Universe. Win Scott Eckert, ed. Austin, TX: MonkeyBrain Books, 2005, and in Pearls from Peoria. Paul Spiteri, ed. Burton, MI: Subterranean Press, 2006.

“The Arms of Tarzan.” Burroughs Bulletin No. 22, Summer 1971. Myths. Id. Pearls. Id.

“Tarzan’s Coat of Arms.” ERB-Dom No. 52, November 1971.Designed by Farmer, illustrated by Bjo Trimble.

“A Reply To ‘The Red Herring.’” ERBANIA No. 28, December 1971. Myths. Id. Pearls. Id.

“The Two Lord Ruftons.” Baker Street Journal, December 1971. Myths. Id. Pearls. Id

“The Obscure Life and Hard Times of Kilgore Trout.” Moebius Trip  No. 11, December 1971. Expanded version The Book of Philip José Farmer. New York: DAW Books, 1973. Revised edition New York: Berkley Books, 1982. Venus on the Half-Shell and Others. Id. Venus on the Half-Shell. London: Titan Books, 2013.

“Tarzan Lives.” Esquire, April 1972. Reprinted as “An Exclusive Interview with Lord Greystoke.” The Book of Philip José Farmer. New York: DAW Books, 1973. Revised edition New York: Berkley Books, 1982. Reprinted in The Best of Philip José Farmer. Id. Reprinted in Tarzan Alive. Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press Bison Books, 2006.

“The Great Korak–Time Discrepancy.” ERB-dom No. 57, April 1972. Myths. Id. Pearls. Id.

“The Lord Mountford Mystery.” ERB-dom No. 65, December 1972. Myths. Id. Pearls.

“From ERB To Ygg.” Erbivore, August 1973. Myths. Id. Pearls.

“A Language for Opar.” ERB-dom No. 75, 1974. Myths. Id. Pearls.

“Extracts from the Memoirs of ‘Lord Greystoke.’” Mother Was a Lovely Beast. New York: Pyramid Books, 1974. Reprinted in Tarzan Alive. Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press Bison Books, 2006. Reprinted in Up the Bright River. Gary K. Wolfe, ed. Burton, MI: Subterranean Press, 2010.

“Jonathan Swift Somers III, Cosmic Traveller in a Wheelchair: A Short Biography by Philip José Farmer (Honorary Chief Kennel Keeper).” Scintillation No. 13, June 1977. (Myths/Pearls.) Venus on the Half-Shell. London: Titan Books, 2013.

“Doc Wildman’s Coat of Arms.” Farmerphile: The Magazine of Philip José Farmer No. 14, October 2008. Win Scott Eckert and Paul Spiteri, eds. Reconstructed by Win Scott Eckert and illustrated by Keith Howell from notes and a design by Farmer. Reprinted in The Evil in Pemberley House Chapbook. Burton, MI: Subterranean Press, 2009. Reprinted in Doc Savage: His Apocalyptic Life (Deluxe Hardcover Edition). Win Scott Eckert, ed. Atlanta, GA: Meteor House, 2013.


Essays – Other

These essays include articles, introductions, forewords, afterwords, and addenda which are not “creatively mythological” in nature. They provide important information, but not within the creative mythography conceit that it is all real.

“Oft Have I Travelled (on Solar Pons).” The Pontine Dossier, April 1969. Reprinted in Pearls from Peoria. Id. Reprinted in The Solar Pons Gazette, Vol. 1, No.1, Summer 2006.

“Writing the Biography of Doc Savage.” Pulp #5 1/2, July 1973. Reprinted in The Man Behind Doc Savage as “Writing Doc’s Biography,” 1974. Reprinted in Pearls from Peoria. Id. Reprinted in Doc Savage: His Apocalyptic Life (Deluxe Hardcover Edition). Win Scott Eckert, ed. Atlanta, GA: Meteor House, 2013.

“Edgar Rice Burroughs.” 20th Century Fiction, 1985. Reprinted in Pearls from Peoria. Id.

“Why and How I Became Kilgore Trout.” Venus on the Half-Shell. New York: Bantam Books, 1988. Venus on the Half-Shell and Others. Id. Venus on the Half-Shell. London: Titan Books, 2013.

“Afterword.” Doc Savage Omnibus #13. New York: Bantam Books, 1990. Reprinted in Doc Savage: His Apocalyptic Life (Deluxe Hardcover Edition). Win Scott Eckert, ed. Atlanta, GA: Meteor House, 2013.

“I Still Live!” Farmerphile: The Magazine of Philip José Farmer No. 3, January 2006. Christopher Paul Carey and Paul Spiteri, eds. Reprinted in Up From the Bottomless Pit and Other Stories. Id.

“Sherlock Holmes and Sufism.” Farmerphile: The Magazine of Philip José Farmer No. 12, April 2008. Win Scott Eckert and Paul Spiteri, eds.